Personal Weaknesses

John Finn

Quintin Merck

Sid Bennett

Scotty Nichols

Ted Fehr

greed*

greed*

capriciousness

carelessness

capriciousness

laziness

carelessness

faith

compulsiveness

stubbornness

dishonesty

fear

faith

superstitiousness

exhibitionism

greed

fear

impulsiveness

(uncontrolled)

impulsiveness

inattentiveness

inattentiveness

instability

irrationality

laziness

irrationality

laziness

mysticism

laziness

stubbornness

preoccupation

preoccupation

self-pity

self-pity

subjectiveness

subjectiveness

timidity

superstitiousness

worry

worry

* Greed can be a personal strength if rationally controlled.

With eyes fixed on the sandwich, everyone calls the first bet. John aggressively bets his strong hand. Many players keep calling. The final bets are large. Scotty keeps calling with a poor hand. "Should fold," he says, catching his breath. "But that sub ... yum." The red-faced man spends over $100 on calls. Three other players also call as their eyes remain fixed on the sandwich. The pot is the largest of the night--over $700. John wins both high and low with an ace-high full house and a six-five low. He also wins back the sandwich, which he later used to build another pot.

With a small investment, John Finn exploits opponents' lack of discipline to win may extra hundreds of dollars.

The good player continually exploits man's most pervasive weakness--laziness. Laziness foments desires to gain values without effort. That, in turn, leads to seeking unearned approval, respect, and money. The good player uses those desires to manipulate his opponents with "favors" that symbolize (and falsely promise) approval, respect, and money. His victims bend to his will in seeking those pseudo favors.

"Favors and bribes that the good player extends and withdraws for his personal profit include--

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