What To Stay On

(1) A-A, A-K, A-Q, A-J, A-10, K-A, K-K, K-Q, K-J, K-10, Q-A, Q-K, Q-Q, Q-J, Q-10, J-A, J-K, J-Q, J-J, J-10, 10-A, 10-K, 10-Q, 10-J, 10-10-

I also stay on

  • 2) A-9, A-8, A-7, A-6, A-5, A-4, A-3, A-2, K-9, K-8, K-7, K-6, K-5, K-4, K-3, K-2-But fold if one Ace or one King is exposed-Under (1) and (2), the 3rd card must be above a Nine for me to draw the 4th card- If I then have 3 cards above a Nine, I will take the 4th and 5th cards unless I am beat in sight or unless I have reason to believe I am beat by a concealed pair- Of course, if I have a big pair back to back, I naturally stay, regardless of the size of the 3rd or 4th cards-
  • 3) I will play 9-9 backed up until I am beat in sight or until I think I am beat by a concealed pair-
  • 4) I will take only one card to small back-up pairs such as 2-2, 3-3,4-4, 5-5,6-6,7-7,8-8. If I make a set of Threes on the 3rd card of course I will stay. My refusal to take more than one card to these pairs is my greatest contribution to Five-Card Stud. I know you may be tempted to take more cards to a small pair, but don't do it. To do so will keep you broke. Here's why:

First, the betting gets too stiff to warrant taking more cards.

The percentages are against you. Second, in seven-handed Stud, if everyone draws cards, four will pair. And it is just as easy to make a big pair as it is a small one if, when you stay, you hold high cards. So why draw more than one to a small pair?

THE PLAY

I have dealt three hands as exercises.

1st deal

The Deal

One

One

Down

Up

1st

player is dealt K

A

2nd

6

3rd

7

4th

9

5th

2.

6th

8.

7th

1st player is high with the Ace. He bets. 2nd with Two Sixes just calls. 3rd calls on K-7.

4th calls on 8-9.1 would fold this hand. 5th folds on 3-2. A bust. 6th calls on J-8.1 would fold this. 7th calls on 2-A. I would fold.

The Deal

One

Two

Down

Up

1st

player is dealt K

A 2 Ace-King Deuce

2nd

6 6 Three sixes.

3rd

7 K Two Kings.

4th

9 J Jack High.

6th

8 7 Jack High.

7th

A 5 Ace High.

The Betting

2nd hand holds Three Sixes, two of which are exposed. He bets.

3rd raises on Two Kings, according to the book. 4th, 6th, 7th and 1st players all fold.

2nd player just calls, waiting for the kill with Three Sixes.

The Deal One Three

Down Up

2nd player is dealt 6 6 6 3 Three Sixes

The Betting

2nd player with Two Exposed Sixes checks. He knows 3rd will bet.

3rd bets on Two Kings, taking the bait. 2nd raises with Three Sixes.

3rd should know he is trapped and should fold, but he calls.

The Deal One Three

Down Up

2nd player is dealt 6 6 6 3 A Three Sixes

The Betting

2nd player is High with Two Exposed Sixes. He bets. 3rd player knows he is beat but is curious enough to call. It is hard to drive out a sucker once he has his money in the pot.

Winning Hand

Three Sixes, held by 2nd player.

2nd deal

The Deal

One

One

Down

Up

1st

player is dealt 9

9 Two Nines

2nd

5 Five High

3rd

J Ace High

4th

9 Jack High

5th

9 Nine High

6th

5 King High

7th

3rd player is High with the Jack. He bets.

4th player calls on J-9. This is an especially poor call because two of his Nines are exposed. 5th also calls. This is a poor call for the same reason. 6th calls on K-5.

7th raises on Two Concealed Eights. He thinks more of Two Eights than I do.

1st player sees an opportunity to win a small pot and re-raises on Two Concealed Nines.

2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th players cannot stand a double raise and fold. 7th player calls on Two Eights.

The Deal

1st 7th

The Betting

One Down player is dealt 9 8

Two Up

9 J Two Nines 8 K Two Eights

7th player is High with the King. He checks his Two Eights.

1st bets on Two Concealed Nines.

7th calls. He thinks he is beat, but hopes to draw out.

The Deal One

Down 2nd player is dealt 9

Three Up

9 J 2 Two Nines 8 K 2 Two Eights

The Betting

7th player is High with Two Concealed Eights and the

King, and checks. 1st player bets his Two Concealed Nines. 7th at last folds.

Winning Hand Two Nines, held by 1st player.

3rd DEAL

The Deal

One

One

Down

Up

1st

player is dealt A

2 Ace High

2nd

J Two Jacks

3rd

A Ace High

4th

,, ,, ,, Q

K King High

5th

3 Three High

6th

4 Five High

7th

3rd player is High with the Ace. He must bet and does. 4th player stays with King High. 5th, 6th and 7th players fold.

1st calls with Ace High. He should fold because 3rd player has an Ace exposed. 2nd player with Two Jacks does not want to disclose his hand, and just calls.

The Deal One

Down 1st player is dealt A

Two Up

2 3 Ace High. No Change. J 7 Two Jacks. No Change A 6 Ace High. No Change K 10 King High. No Change

The Betting 3rd player is High with the Ace. He bets. 4th player calls with King High.

1st player calls with the Ace.

2nd player raises with Two Jacks, hoping opponents will think he has Two Sevens.

3rd and 4th players call. 1st player folds.

The Deal One

Down 2nd player is dealt J

Three Up

J 7 9 Two Jacks. No Change A 6 2 Ace High. No Change K 10 10 Two Tens. Improved

The Betting

4th player bets with Two Tens. 2nd raises with Two Concealed Jacks. 3rd folds.

4th calls with Two Tens.

The Deal

One Four

Down Up player is dealt J J 7 8 A Two Jacks. No Change

Player is dealt Q K 10 10 4 Two Tens. No Change

The Betting

4th player checks his Two Tens.

2nd player bets the Two Concealed Jacks.

At this stage of the game there is so much money in the pot that 4th player calls.

Winning Hand

Two Jacks, held by 2nd player.

Five-Card Draw, Deuces Wild with the Joker

Monty caught a fellow cheating at cards a few days later- He pretended to be a sucker when, in fact, he was cheating the life out of us, especially at stud- Some of us sensed this but couldn't spot what was going on- Monty was playing and called me into his study-'Do you know that new guy?

  • I've seen him a couple of times- He's called One-Eye Jones- He's from Indianapolis, I think-' 'Did you notice anything shady?'
  • No, except that thick lens he is wearing over his good eye- I don't recall he ever wore glasses before-'

Monty pulled out a deck of cards- 'I put these in my pocket when we changed packs the last time-' It is customary to change decks quite often -not to detect cheating, but because players become superstitious when they aren't winning, and call for a new deck-

Monty held the pack under a light, back up, bent half of the deck towards him, and released the cards one at a time- When he did this fast you could see the marks- They stood out like a motion picture film turned slowly-

'Just what I suspected,' he said with a hearty laugh- 'We sure are suckers not to spot this- One-Eye's sight must be pretty poor if he has to use magnifying glasses-'

The cards, according to Monty, were professionally marked by a person who caters to crooks- In stud, One-Eye, with his magnifying glasses, could read the back of every down card around the table- No wonder we were all losers- Monty, who was running the game, sent Runt after One-Eye and his chips- When told he'd been caught red-handed, One-Eye gave a sheepish grin-

'How did you switch decks?' asked Monty in a cold voice-'I dropped a chip on the floor and made the switch when I picked it up-' 'You crooks must think this place a soft touch,' Monty said angrily-'Guess you read the penalty?' One-Eye shook his head- 'I put a sign on the wall only last week warning crooks I'd throw them out on their ass and they'd forfeit their take-out and all winnings if caught- Got anything to say for yourself?'

No - except if I have to be thrown out I'd rather Runt did it than you-' Monty gained his good humour at once- 'All right, Runt- Throw him out the back way but don't be too rough-'

Monty was counting One-Eye's chips- 'There's a little over five hundred here-'

  • For a private charity, I suppose,' I said slyly-'You guessed it- It's for Lucille March-'
  • Lucille March!' I exclaimed- 'Why, she's a drug addict- You mean her dad, a deacon in the church, would take charity from a gambler?'
  • The old hypocrite will never know- I'm sending this money to her sister, who will arrange for Lucille to visit her and then enter an institution for cure-'
  • Well, I'll be a so-and-so, as you say. Old Doc Prittle must be pretty proud of himself with all the drug addicts he's made in town.'
  • That's about all he knows - morphine, quinine, and calomel. He certainly doesn't know anything about abortion and sure did a butcher's job on Lucille.'

Lucille's history was no town secret. The town even knew that Chic the chicken picker was the guilty one. The town whispered that Lucille insisted on Doc's performing an operation. Complications set in and Doc gave her morphine to ease the pain. 'I hope she gets cured in Indianapolis,' Monty said. 'You're a good man, Monty,' I said affectionately.

Monty looked embarrassed. 'You were going to talk about the poker cut,' he said, changing the subject, but first he called to Jack to take over.

  • Well, I have two ideas. The amount of the money you make on cutting the pots depends on how many pots there are per hour. Make an eighth place at the table and get a fast dealer to deal all the hands. A lot of time is lost with each player dealing.'
  • I'm afraid the boys wouldn't like that. Each man likes to deal. Besides, they'd probably suspect I had a confederate dealing me winning hands. What's the other idea?'
  • Let's get two old decks and sit at the table.' When this was done I passed one deck to Monty, who was sitting to my left. 'Now assume I have just dealt and after the showdown am arranging the discards, preparing to shuffle them,' I said. I mixed up the cards and began to gather them in, simulating an actual case. 'Now you start dealing draw or stud.' Monty began dealing seven-handed draw. By the time he was through dealing each imaginary person five cards, I had finished shuffling my pack, and placed it to Monty's left.
  • You note,' I said, 'with two decks we handle the discards as we do now except that they are tossed to the dealer rather than to the player at the dealer's left. After the showdown the dealer picks up the discards and shuffles while the player to his left, you in this case, is dealing. It will speed up the deals twenty-five per cent according to my calculations with my dad's stop watch and consequently increase the cuts by a like amount.'
  • Excellent idea, kid. We'll start this at once. Want your share of the increased cut?' he joked.
  • You're kidding me, Monty.' His face was usually in repose or deadpan, but when he broke into a smile the whole room seemed to light up. 'Got time to give me some fine points on deuces wild?' I asked diffidently.
  • I've got time to give you hell for not raising on pat hands,' he said. 'You've made that mistake several times. Now, if you have a pat hand - a straight, flush or a full -and aren't in a position to raise in order to chase the timid soul, every son-of-a-bitch and his brother is going to draw against you, for as you know, these simpletons act like they're playing straight draw instead of draw with four wild deuces and the joker.
  • Remember,' he continued, 'with five wild cards, almost anyone can open, and they do. On the other hand, in straight draw only a player with jacks or better can open. In deuces, holding a pat hand, I'd risk a passed pot rather than open. Oh, you might open if you sit just one position to the dealer's right,' he concluded. 'I'll try to remember, Monty,' I said in a low voice.
  • Oh, don't be so sensitive about it. It's for your own good.' Monty was laughing at me. 'As I said, these simpletons, except for a few exceptions, open with one deuce, or a joker - two aces, two kings, three small ones -about everything in the deck. If all of them draw, you'll get beat with a pat hand. Suppose they all draw and someone bets you a hunk? What you going to do?' 'Eat them, I guess.'
  • Now, here's the way to play the pat hand,' he continued. 'Check and wait for someone to open. It is usually opened for the size of the pot, say three dollars and fifty cents.'
  • You forget we cut the pot fifty cents.'
  • Oh, dammit, don't be so technical. Suppose three stay. That's four players or about fifteen dollars in the pot, a worthwhile winning. Now bet twenty dollars or about a fifteen-dollar raise. You'll be surprised to see how many throw in the sponge. With only one or two stayers you've got a pretty good chance of winning. No one is going to back in on you after you've made a twenty-dollar bet, unless they have two wild cards or three of a kind above the ten, or at least I wouldn't.
  • So your opponents draw. You stand pat. If they check, you spread. If one of them bets - well, that is a horse of another colour. You're in a mouse trap. Judge your man. Has he really got the guts to bet if he can't beat a pat hand ?' Monty shook his head. 'Kid, I can't tell you what to do under those circumstances. You're on your own.'
  • Suppose under the same circumstances 1 raise and draw one card.' 'To what?
  • To a bust - nothing.'
  • What are you trying to make your opponents believe?' Monty asked.
  • To believe I have four of a kind and am trying to make the fifth.'

Monty laughed heartily. "These simpletons will never believe you. They'll think you're drawing to a straight, flush, or two pair.'

  • You know I'm not simple-minded enough to draw to such cards.'
  • Hell, no. But the point is, do they? Oh, a strong player may fall for your idea,' he added as an afterthought. 'Now, kid, you're playing real good and winning us some money - that's the proof. But you still gamble with weaker hands than I do.' He looked at his watch.

I asked, 'Do you have time to go over again with me just what cards you stay on in deuces wild? You've given me a good lesson on the pat hand.'

  • Those geldings can wait just thirty minutes for poker. I've got a date.'
  • The smell of horses, moonlight and dew glistening on green grass?' I asked slyly.
  • The smell of horses, moonlight, and wet dew glistening on green grass,' Monty corrected with a straight face. He had picked up a pad and was writing.

After a few moments he said, 'Here, study this. It tells you what to play on, when to call, and when to raise. The x represents any card other than a face card or an ace.'

A A A x x or better

Raise

K K K x x

Raise

Q Q Q x x

Call

J J J x x

Call

2A A x x or better

Raise

2K K x x

Raise

2Q Q x x

Call

2J J x x

Call

2 2 x x x or better

Raise

Straights

Raise

Flushes

Raise

Full Houses

Raise

'Never,' he said emphatically, 'stay with only one wild card unless you hold three j acks or better, not even 2 10 10 xx.'

I studied the list a moment. 'Jesus, Monty, no wonder you told me you hadn't lost in three years, if you only stay on such strong hands. If everyone played like you do there wouldn't be a poker game.'

  • No, there wouldn't,' Monty admitted. 'When I play I either think I have the best hand or the makings of one. I'm not interested in second-best hands. Let the suckers stay on less.'
  • It looks like poker, as you play it, is a sort of legalized theft.'
  • Yes, it is,' Monty said. 'And only once removed from playing like a card sharp.'
  • We play table stakes here. You mean I can win at limit poker with these pointers you have given me?'
  • What the hell's the difference whether I bet you a buck or a hundred if I think the odds favour my winning? Players who can't win at limit poker and imagine they could at table stakes are victims of wishful thinking. A sound poker player can win in any poker game.
  • While we are on the subject of poker, I should like to give you a bit of advice,' Monty continued. 'One of the most important things you should do is to keep a file on all players - name, approximate age, condition of health, and obvious characteristics. Then study the players at all times for characteristics not so obvious. After a while you will get to know them like a book and can accurately determine in most cases when they help their hands and when they are trying to run a bluff.
  • Though you usually play cards at the same place and among the same crowd, there will be times when you visit another club or group and may wish to play, provided the game is not too tight. A few moments' observation will tell you this. If, for example, they are playing seven-handed, and four players stay consistently, you know the game is loose because four players out of seven cannot possibly hold minimum strength consistently, as I define it. It follows therefore that a number of weak players are in the game.
  • A hopeless and helpless friend of mine told me he had lost twenty-five thousand dollars during a lifetime of poker. I gave him a few lessons, then watched him play. He still tossed his money away. When I reminded him of this he simply looked confused. I said, "You played only two hours and lost your Old Soldier's cheque. If you played-percentages you could play every day and still have your cheque." He shook his head sadly. "I don't know, Monty," he said. "I guess I just like to play cards."
  • Never stay in a poker game unless there are at least three suckers. If possible, let them do your betting for you, and sit to their left because they are usually wild players who bet on everything and anything. Sitting to their left gives you the option whether to stay, raise, or fold your hand.
  • I am reminded of players who insist on "betting on the come"; that is, to bet that their next card will improve the hand. I have listened to their arguments and nodded in agreement, but I simply do not play that kind of poker unless the odds are in my favour. I figure the odds for every card I draw, and if the odds are not favourable, I fold. This doesn't sound very friendly. But what's friendly about poker? It's a cut-throat game, at best.'

I was eating prairie chicken at ten cents a chicken at Monty's bar about ten days later when Jack came in to tell me that he wanted relief and that he had left a vacant seat. 'Is Monty playing?'

'Yes. It's eight o'clock now. I'll be back at 2 a.m.'

I went in and sat down in the chair vacated by Jack. There were two new faces. I had seen the two hanging around the tent show where they featured such plays as Ten Nights in a Barroom, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Dr Jekyll andMr Hyde, and the like.

'Kid, you know Tom Lawrence and Pete Hunter, leading man and producer,' Monty said with a sweep of his hand.

I nodded the introduction- The handsome chap sitting at Monty's left I judged to be the leading man; the other, sitting next to the actor, looked for all the world like a producer- He was chewing at a dry cigar and he grinned constantly, showing yellow teeth filled with gold inlays which glistened in the lamplight-

I sat next, then Chic the chicken picker, Doc and then Bones Alverson, the farmer, his leather-like face beaten from exposure- I knew he had lost most of his farm at poker- Rumour had it that he had hocked everything to Bert Willis, the land speculator, known to be a ruthless and shrewd operator-

I turned to Chic- He had several stacks in front of him- 'You must have sold some more dead chickens,' I said in a low voice- Chic was a notoriously poor poker player and when he wasn't taking live chickens to New York he picked them dry at the poultry house for three cents a head-

He gave me a sour look- 'Keep your mouth shut, you little shrimp,' he warned-

The game progressed as usual - some winning, some losing- I was trying to remember all that Monty had told me, and played carefully-

Monty looked bored- Doc Brittle nodded in his seat between deals, his head resting on his double chin- Bones Alverson was getting some good hands and was winning consistently- The actor and his backer seemed alert and were holding their own-

The game droned on- I got up and stretched my legs to relieve my nervousness- I don't know what it was but I had a feeling of impending tragedy- And it wasn't long in coming-

Doc Prittle was fumbling with the deck- He had put in the joker preparatory to dealing deuces wild and was awkwardly reshuffling the cards-

Monty watched him in disgust- 'Deal, goddammit, Doc'

Startled, Doc yelled back, 'Hold your horses,' then, after taking his time, began to deal five-card draw deuces wild-

Bones, the farmer, skinned back his cards in his gnarled hands- I imagined I saw a flicker in his eyes- Anyway he made an unusual opening bet- He bet $50 right under the gun

Monty, sitting next, studied Bones for a fleeting moment, then folded- He later told me he held a jack full-The actor tossed his hand in the discards in disgust-

But his producer was grinning impishly- 'I raise one hundred,' he said and tossed in the chips-

I threw my hand in the discards, as did also Chic and Doc, the dealerLooks like those two had all the wild cards, I reflected-

Bones pretended to study a moment then counted out a big stack of chips, for he had been winning- 'I up you five hundred,' he said, his voice quivering-

Bones had a mouthful of tobacco juice and was watching the producer intently- I could see he was afraid to turn his head to spit- He made the motion to do so, but changed his mind and swallowed tobacco cud, juice and all- He choked a bit, and pulled out a red handkerchief and wiped his mouth-

Monty, seeing the play, cried the usual 'I'll be a son-of-a-bitch-' Bones choked again- 'Well,' he said to the grinning producer, 'what the hell you going to do?'

The producer took out a sheaf of hundred-dollar bills- 'I'm just going to raise you five hundred-'

  • Raise you five hundred more,' Bones quivered, 'you city prick-' He turned to Monty- 'Put in one thousand, Monty,' he said- Monty demurred-'You've never seen me welch on a bet,' Bones pleaded-
  • No, I never did,' said Monty thoughtfully- 'But you used to have a farm-Do you have one now?'
  • I'll tell you the God's own truth, Monty,' he said- 'I've got the farm stock and implements plastered to Bert Willis for fifteen thousand. Bert offered me twenty thousand. So I have five thousand equity.'

Monty shook his head sadly. 'Bones, let me give you some friendly advice. Just call him. I'll lend you money for that.'

  • Call, hell!' exclaimed Bones. 'This is a chance of a lifetime. Loan me the thousand. I want to raise the bastard.'
  • I can't understand you, Bones. You've lost three-fourths of your farm and now you want to bet the last fourth.'
  • Goddammit, yes. I might just as well be broke as to try to pay ten per cent interest on fifteen thousand to that goddamned bloodsucker.'
  • Jesus,' said Monty, 'I don't mind risking the thousand but-'
  • You ain't risking nothing, goddammit. I've got him beat.'
  • All right. But you give me first chance to buy the farm if you do lose.' Monty tossed two five-hundred-dollar bills in the pot and took B ones's IOU.

The producer had lost his grin. Even the unlighted cigar had disappeared somehow. He reached for his purse and spread five hundred-dollar bills and pushed them in the pot.

He said in a subdued voice, 'There's my five hundred and I raise two thousand. I'll have to give you an IOU.' 'You will in a pig's ass. Go get it.' 'How can I? The banks are closed.'

  • You ain't got no two thousand in the bank. Put up or shut up,' said Bones.
  • Monty, will you take my IOUT asked the producer.
  • Let me tell you bastards something,' Monty replied. Tm not financing this poker game. I'm just playing in it. If I'd wanted to stay I'd have stayed and financed myself if I got in trouble. And another thing. You bastards slow up a game. I only get fifty cents cut. This one I should cut five hundred.'

No one offered to agree to this but I had a sneaking feeling that Monty was going to profit in this transaction somehow.

The producer placed some chips on his cards resting on the table and got up and pulled along the actor with him. They went in the other end of the room and I couldn't hear what they said, but the actor was protesting and the producer was really telling it to him. Finally, they both sat down.

The producer addressed Monty. 'You know my reputation. You know I own three other tent shows and I can tell you I don't owe a dime on them. My leading man here owns one-third of this show. I'd like to own that farm even if it is mortgaged.' 'Well,' said Monty, 'what's your proposition?*

"This farmer gave you an IOU for one thousand. Put it in the pot and take out one thousand in cash. That makes you square. I'll make out a bill of sale for my show for two thousand, if this farmer will make out a bill of sale for his farm for three thousand. The extra thousand covers the money you take from the pot.'

  • Bones, do you understand the deal?' asked Monty. 'Is the show worth two thousand?' 'I'd like to own it for that.'
  • But I'm pledging three thousand and my equity is five thousand.' 'You'll get the difference if you lose.'
  • Goddammit, I'm not going to lose. I'd like to own a show. More money in it than following a plough around a field, I reckon.'
  • It's your funeral,' said Monty prophetically, and directed Runt to bring in bills of sale, pen and ink. When Monty looked over the papers he pointed out that the producer's bill of sale needed the actor's signature because of a one-third interest. He put Bones's IOU in the pot and took out a thousand according to the agreement.
  • Just a minute, Monty. I didn't pledge my prize bull. Nobody's going to plaster him with a mortgage.'
  • He'll get plastered if you fill your hand.' Monty laughed. 'How many cards you want, Bones? You take cards first.' 'I want one,' Bones said and tossed his discard towards Doc. Doc was so nervous he could scarcely get a card off the top of the deck. Monty didn't help much by yelling at him. Doc finally nicked a card face down towards Bones. It touched Bones's hand, bounced; then turned over, exposed. I looked at it horror-stricken, for I had said a little prayer for Bones.

It was the joker.

Bones opened his mouth as if to protest, but no sound came. He just sat there fascinated and stared at the joker who, I thought, stared impishly back at him. Then a deep pallor began to creep slowly over Bones's weather-beaten face.

  • What'll I do, Monty? Can't Bones take the joker?'
  • No. If you'd read the rules you'd know he can't. They're all printed and framed on the wall behind you. You deal whatever cards the producer wants to him, then Bones gets the next card. Tough luck, Bones.'

The pallor had spread over Bones's face. His eyes looked glazed. Suddenly he fell over the table, clutching the cards in his heavy fist.

At this Doc jumped up, handing me the deck. He examined Bones for several seconds. At last he said, 'He's dead, boys.'

An air of disbelief settled over the players. Even Monty was speechless for the moment, then, 'You're sure, Doc?' he asked.

'Yes, I'm sure. His heart stopped. Too much excitement. I guess I killed him.'

The producer made a pass at the pot, starting to rake it in. Monty's fist reached out and nearly broke the showman's wrist. 'Hands off!' Monty snarled.

  • It's mine,' protested the producer.
  • Not yet, my friend,' Monty said softly. 'I think he had you beat. He didn't need the joker.'
  • Well, I don't think so, and I demand to draw to my hand,' said the producer.
  • Kid,' asked Monty, 'has the deck been disturbed?* 'No. Doc handed it to me.'
  • Well, I'm going to write a new rule that Hoyle didn't cover. If you fellows agree, I'll rule we let our producer draw to his hand, then take Bones's cards from his fist and add the next card to it.' They all nodded agreement except the producer, who protested feebly. 'How many cards you want?' asked Monty. 'One,' said the producer. 'Kid, give him a card.' The producer threw me the discard and I gave him one, face down. By that time Doc had pried Bones's cards from his huge fist, so I slipped Doc a card to fill out the hand.
  • Now wait a moment, boys,' said Monty. 'Who wants to bet on the winning hand?'

The actor was the only one to answer. 'I've got five hundred that says my producer wins.'

'Covered,' said Monty, tossing the money on the table. The producer spread his hand. He held Q K K K 2. 'Four Kings,' said Monty.

Doc turned over Bones's cards one at a time, calling them out as he did so. 'Ace, ace, ace, jack, deuce - four aces.'

  • You ran second,' Monty said to the producer. 'That's irony for you. A man dies holding the winning hand - ' and he picked up the actor's bet. Then he began to rake in the pot. 'I'll take this to Bones's widow. She'll probably grieve a couple of days, then be relieved that he's dead. At least he can't gamble the farm away now.' The producer said, 'I'll redeem that bill of sale, Monty, when the banks open.'
  • You will like hell,' said Monty. I'll redeem it myself if the widow consents. I've always wanted to go in show business.'

Three: monty's comment:

Summary of Deuces Wild This will teach you to win either at limit poker or table stakes.

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