Famous bluffs Jack Straus and the

The late Jack Straus, who won the 1982 World Series of Poker, was a man known for his creativity, flair, and imagination at the poker table, as well as his willingness to risk all he had if he liked the odds. Once, in a No-Limit Hold'em game, Straus was dealt a 7 and a 2 of different suits. That starting hand is one of the worst in the deck one the overwhelming majority of pjay-ers would throw away without a moment's hesitation. But not Straus not this time. I was on a rush, he said, so I...

Beyond the Written Word

You need a lot more than book learning to become a successful poker player. Personal characteristics, integrity, strength of purpose, resiliency, willfulness and dedication are all ladled into this stew. As in almost every other human endeavor, talent is nice to have, but character and the ability to stick with it count too. Where to get the books A buyer's guide You can purchase many of the books we mention in this section at the major chain bookstores, but there are other sources that...

Hout SeVen Stud Differs From SeVen Card Stud

How well you play your first three cards in Seven-Card Stud poker is one of the keys to success. Successful play demands an awareness of whether the cards that can improve your hand are still alive. Seven-Card Stud players also need to anticipate what players acting after them might do, based on their door cards. These considerations also hold true for Seven-Stud 8. But that's where the road forks. In Seven-Card Stud once you decide to play the hand you've been dealt, the next major decision...

Jack Treetop Straus

Everyone called Jack Straus Treetop because he stood six-feet seven-inches tall and had a big bushy beard. He was a truly lovable man, a larger-than-life figure with a reputation for gambling every single dollar in his pocket on a daily basis. Straus carried around bundles of money, which often amounted to thousands of dollars, stuffed haphazardly into a brown paper bag. On more than one occasion, Straus lost the bag and was left flat broke. He usually dismissed these losses with a casual...

Benny Binion

One of Las Vegas's last true patriarchs, Benny Binion started out by running illegal bootlegging and gambling rackets in Dallas during the 1930s. Binion arrived in Las Vegas in 1946 some insist to evade murder charges back in Texas and bought the dilapidated Eldorado Casino. He renamed it Binion's Horseshoe, and it soon became the epicenter of gambling activity. The Horseshoe wasn't really built for common tourists it was a place for real gamblers. For more than four decades, Binion had a...